Course Catalog

Current Undergraduate Courses that I Teach Regularly

Fall:  WX 201 (Survey of Meteorology), WX 301 (Aviation Weather), WX 327 (Operational Analysis and Forecasting), WX 466 (Advanced Synoptic Analysis and Forecasting)

Spring:  WX 301 (Aviation Weather), WX 381 (Climate Dynamics), WX 436 (Advanced Operational Forecasting)

WX 201:  SURVEY OF METEOROLOGY (FALL)

This is a survey course in atmospheric science that includes applications to flight. Included is a systematic development of the following: thermal patterns, atmospheric moisture, horizontal and vertical pressure patterns, clouds, atmospheric circulation, local winds, stability, air masses, fronts, fog, icing, thunderstorms, jet streams and turbulence. Students will study and make use of surface weather observations, surface maps, and constant pressure maps.  

CURRENT WEATHER DISCUSSIONS ARE INCLUDED AT THE BEGINNING OF EACH CLASS PERIOD, AS INTERESTING WEATHER DICTATES.

See the Fall 2015 Syllabus

I use Meteorology Today (Ahrens and henson) as the textbook for this course.  

 

WX 301:  aVIATION WEATHER (FAll and SPRING)

This course is an expansion of WX201 with a focus on aviation weather hazards, including convective hazards (thunderstorms, hail, high winds), non-convective weather hazards (fog, icing, turbulence, wind shear, winter weather), and special weather hazards (volcanic ash and space weather). Meteorological concepts such as pressure, atmospheric forces, thickness, thermal wind, fronts, jet streams, cyclone formation, and atmospheric stability are expanded and applied to aviation operations. Emphasis is on navigating today's online environment for obtaining and analyzing real-time surface observations, upper-air observations, satellite data, and radar data, as well as both primary and supplementary aviation weather products.

Lab exercises and projects complement the lectures through use of current and historic weather examples to provide practical experience in making informed weather-sensitive decisions.

SEE THE FALL 2017 SYLLABUS

WX 327:  oPERATIONAL ANALYSIS AND FORECASTING (fALL)

Introduction to operational weather analysis and forecasting using conceptual understanding of observations, numerical model output, and synoptic-scale processes. Meteorological time and date conventions; surface station plots; METAR and SYNOP code; upper-air station plots; isoplething of surface and upper-air isobaric charts; basic satellite and radar feature identification; temperature and vorticity advection; advection on upper-air and sea-level pressure charts; vorticity, divergence, and continuity; advection and relationship to vertical motion; pattern recognition and conceptual analysis using upper-air charts; pattern recognition and conceptual analysis using sea-level pressure charts; skew-T analysis; types of soundings; basic temperature and precipitation forecasting

SEE THE FALL 2017 SYLLABUS

WX 381:  Climate dynamics (spring)

Primarily quantitative introduction to physical and dynamical processes of climate, climate variability, and climate change. Atmospheric general circulation and relation to climate; climate sensitivity and feedback mechanisms; atmosphere-ocean interaction and coupling; El Nino and Southern Oscillation; atmospheric teleconnections; seasonal and long-range weather forecasting; climate modeling and climate model simulations; internally-forced (natural) climate variability; externally-forced (anthropogenic) climate change; quantitative understanding of future climate scenarios; review of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report. 

SEE THE Spring 2016 SYLLABUS

Kerry Cook'S Climate Dynamics IS THE TEXTBOOK FOR THIS COURSE.

 

WX 436:  aDVANCED OPERATIONAL ANALYSIS AND FORECASTING (sPRING)

Operational weather forecasting tools and techniques. Daily forecasting for locations across the nation and globe. Conceptual case study analysis; conceptual temperature, wind, and precipitation forecasting; numerical forecast model products; model-output statistics (MOS); National Weather Service (NWS) products and services; lake-effect snow; forecasting near terrain; cold-air damming; storm tracks; explosive cyclogenesis; tropical cyclone forecasting; severe storm forecasting

Students produce 5-day forecasts each weekday for the ERAU Campus and  compete in the national weather forecasting contest, the University of Oklahoma WxChallenge.  

SEE THE spring 2017 SYLLABUS

WX 466:  Advanced Synoptic analysis and forecasting (fall)

Weather forecasting tools and techniques. Daily forecasting for locations across the nation and globe. Temperature, wind, and precipitation forecasting; numerical forecast model products; model-output statistics (MOS); National Weather Service (NWS) products and services; applications of Quasi-Geostrophic (QG) theory; Potential Vorticity (PV) thinking and applications; isentropic analysis and applications; dynamically and physically-based case studies

STUDENTS PRODUCE 5-DAY FORECASTS EACH WEEKDAY FOR THE ERAU CAMPUS AND COMPETE IN THE NATIONAL WEATHER FORECASTING CONTEST, THE UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA WXCHALLENGE.  

SEE THE FALL 2017 SYLLABUS

Gary Lackmann's Mid-Latitude synoptic meteorology is the textbook for this course.