MAY 2016:  Severe weather field forecasting in the great plains

Nine students and 3 instructors had the opportunity to travel to the Great Plains for 12 days in mid-late May as part of an An ERAU Study Abroad Program to forecast and observe supercell thunderstorms as part of a 3-credit half-tuition summer course.  We observed a total of 11 tornadoes, including 10 on one day in Dodge City, Kansas, and traveled more than 6000 total miles!  Below are some pictures from our adventure:

 

ERAU C-BREESE:  MAY 2015

Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University Convective-Boundary Research Engaging Educational Experiences

Thanks to a National Science Foundation (NSF) grant through the Center for Severe Weather Research (CSWR), ERAU Meteorology "rented" a Doppler-on-Wheels (DOW) radar for 17 days in May 2015, to study sea breezes and central Florida thunderstorms.  The pictures below show some of our adventures.  

Look for more information in a forthcoming article in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society (BAMS)!

  Doppler-on-Wheels (DOW) underneath mammatus clouds near the ERAU Campus on 5/20/15 during ERAU C-BREESE

Doppler-on-Wheels (DOW) underneath mammatus clouds near the ERAU Campus on 5/20/15 during ERAU C-BREESE

  DOW scanning thunderstorms just north of Tampa Bay on 5/15/15 during ERAU C-BREESE.  A Pileus (cap cloud) and possible gravity wave are evident

DOW scanning thunderstorms just north of Tampa Bay on 5/15/15 during ERAU C-BREESE.  A Pileus (cap cloud) and possible gravity wave are evident

ERAU C-BREESE pictures

May 4 - 20, 2015

 

 

 

Personal Storm Chasing in the Great Plains

I've chased supercells and tornadoes in the Great Plains almost every year since 2006.  Sometimes I even find them.   I've spent a lot of time getting wifi at McDonalds and waiting for caps to break.  I hate the Missouri River and model forecast radar reflectivity.  And don't get me started on Clovis, New Mexico.  

Here are some pictures to prove I'm not entirely supercell repellent :)